The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration

In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.
 
With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties.

Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an “unrecognized immigration” within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic.

 
 Reviews
 
“Epic” is right,September 21, 2010

By Usonian33 
 
This review is from: The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration (Hardcover)

There is a page in the book where Wilkerson recounts what a single day of picking cotton in the old South entailed…it’s a pretty remarkable mini essay in its own right, and you probably won’t forget it. The whole book is like this, with one powerful anecdote after another, woven together with great skill. I’ve always been fascinated with the Jim Crow era in America, and eyewitness stories of those who lived through it…though this book only follows 3 people out of the millions who endured it, it captures America in the 2oth Century as well as just about social history I’ve ever read.

As a gay man, I often look to these books to be inspired by how black Americans “soldiered on” and showed such unbreakable spirit during these years. No, I personally never experienced even 1/10th of their struggle, but it still empowers me to face prejudice and avoid a lazy victimhood mentality. I am incredibly grateful for books like this, as should anyone who faces prejudice or discrimination by a majority.

Clearly a book of this scope took years to complete, and I’m rooting for this to win this year’s National Book Award. I suggest you set aside a whole weekend like I did and savor every page of it.


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