Home » Archives by category » ENTERTAINMENT » Theatre

“Grey Nomad” Reviewed by Dan Berkowitz

The bad news is that, if you don’t speak Australian, you might miss a number of what – to judge by the Australians in the audience – were some of the funniest lines and references ever uttered. The good news is that it doesn’t matter, as there are enough other hilarious lines for you to catch, and there’s more than enough infectious good cheer in Iain Sinclair’s production of Dan Lee’s “Grey Nomad” that you can afford to miss a bunch of it and still come out smiling.

Dan Lee’s first play, “Bottomless,” received the R. E. Ross Trust award for an unproduced play in 2014. It was subsequently developed by Playwriting Australia, Red Stitch Actors Theatre, and the Melbourne Theatre Company, and is scheduled for production next year at 45downstairs in Melbourne. He is also writing two new works for Red Stitch as part of their INK writers program. He’s just flown in from Australia for the premiere of his play “Grey Nomad,” which will be at the Skylight Theatre through October 8. While he’s wildly jet-lagged, I’m going to throw a few questions at him…

Continue reading …

Joseph Kesselring’s “Arsenic and Old Lace” is what’s known in the theatre as a “chestnut” – the kind of play almost everyone knows, or has heard of, or has actually been in, because nearly every high school and/or college in the country has done it. There’s a reason plays such as this are done and done again – they’re well-written, with juicy parts for actors, and just enough surprises and outrageous bits that make them seem fresh. It isn’t “cutting edge” in any way, but it’s a good, solid, old-fashioned play being given a good, solid, old-fashioned production. Warm and fuzzy isn’t a bad thing, come to think of it.

Continue reading …

Rob Clare, born and trained in the UK, is an internationally recognized Shakespeare specialist, who has worked in Ireland, Austria, Germany, Australia, the US, and even in India, where he directed productions of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “Julius Caesar,” and “Romeo and Juliet.” He has worked as a freelance verse and text coach with the Royal Shakespeare Company, and has taught in the US at The Juilliard School, Yale, Brown, NYU Tisch, USC, and CSU Long Beach. His production of “As You Like It” is playing at Antaeus Theatre Company through September 10.

Continue reading …

That Debra Jo Rupp is here now in Los Angeles, and appearing onstage in Bekah Brunstetter’s “The Cake” through August 6, is proof that God indeed loves the world, smiles on California, and wishes our civilization to flourish.

Continue reading …

For some time, there’s been an awareness – and a concern – among performing arts professionals that women artists are underrepresented. We’ve all read about the paltry percentage of major studio films directed by women, or featuring dynamic leading roles for women, so much so that the success of Wonder Woman is being hailed – […]

Continue reading …

A Q&A with playwright Dorothy Fortenberry, whose new play “Species Native to California” plays through June 11 at IAMA Theatre Company

Continue reading …

While many plays start obliquely, then clear things up by the end, “Kiss” is a play which starts confusingly, then spirals down into aggressive incoherence. It’s full of sound and fury, signifying… well, if you can figure it out, I wish you’d tell me.

Continue reading …

Murray Mednick is a pioneer of the off- and off-off-Broadway movements. “The Gary Plays,” a series of six plays he wrote, opens May 4.

Continue reading …

The characters talk a lot, but we never get a sense of what they’re thinking or feeling underneath the words. It’s “what you see is what you get” – in this case, an engrossing (if nasty) story with some interesting (if nasty) characters, but no hint of where they came from, or what propels them to do what they do the way they do it. It’s an attractive and polished surface, but I wish we had occasionally gone a little deeper.

Continue reading …
Page 1 of 27123Next ›Last »